Devolution of Power

There’s a long tradition of local authorities taking (devolving) power from national governments. In the past, this type of devolution has primarily been advanced by conservatives interested in concepts like “states’ rights”, but now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, progressives are becoming interested. How can cities and regions build their power in the age of Trump We’ve already seem them flout federal policies around immigration, marijuana prohibition and climate inaction under the Obama administration. Now the stakes are higher. Cities must assess their strengths and weaknesses in relation to the federal government. What functions, services and funding streams could be taken from cities, and what functions, services and funding streams can cities deny the Feds? Will principled conservatives join with urban progressives to kick off a new phase of the “devolution revolution?” Only time will tell.

 

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